Monday, 15 June 2015

Do kina Lumière prichádza filmová klasika z Ukrajiny

Od 15. do 18. júna môžete nahliadnuť do ukrajinskej filmovej pokladnice. Unikátna prierezová prehliadka najvýznamnejších klasických filmov z dejín ukrajinskej kinematografie je súčasťou širšej pocty Ukrajine a jej filmovej kultúre. Uvedenie výberu reštaurovaných a digitalizovaných filmov, zahŕňa avantgardné diela 20. a 30. rokov dvadsiateho storočia (Zem r. O. Dovženko, Symfónia Donbasu – r. D. Vertov), romantickú drámu z budúcnosti, z čias beztriednej spoločnosti (Strohý mládenec– r. A. Room), slávny vojnový film podľa scenára Vandy Vasilevskej (Dúha – r. M. Donskoj), ale i ďalšie majstrovské diela nasledujúcich dekád. Výber je zameraný na filmy u nás málo alebo vôbec neuvedené: od krátkeho filmu Sergeja Paradžanova (Kyjevské fresky), cez ranné opusy Jurija Ilienka (Prameň pre smädných), Kiry Muratovovej (Dlhé lúčenia) až po populárnu komédiu z 80. rokov od Romana Balajana (Lety v sne a v skutočnosti).

Viac info tu: http://www.aic.sk/aic/sk/doma/archiv/filmova-klasika-z-ukrajiny.html


79 comments:

Veronika Chlapíková said...

The Earth is undoubtedly the most famous and most controversial film of the Ukrainian and Soviet heritage of silent movies. Dovzhenko was the first Ukrainian film director whose at that time, tried to express his worldview differently from the previously displayed and acceptable opinion. He perceived Ukrainian nation as a nation deeply attached to nature, with soil on which he lives, and he cultivates, peaceful existence, which results from its agricultural morality. Background and the people in this morality constitute one indivisible entity, and their way of life is eternal, forever worldview is fixed and unquestionable. Dovzhenkos symbolism is connected just with this order being of the Ukrainian people, to the nature of folk poetry and folklore, which is different from other Soviet avant-gardists of twentieth years. After 32 official and private screenings and May 8, 1930 The Earth is based on Kiev's canvases, but on May 17 the film was banned. The official reason: naturalism and focus on folk traditions and customs. However, Dovzhenko learned that while the USSR banned the film, it enjoying great success in Europe. After its premiere in Berlin on Dovzhenko created 48 articles. In the Soviet Union film re-introduced only in 1958. After an international referendum in Brussels was recognized as one of the top 12 films in the history of world cinema.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

One of the classics of Soviet cinema, Ukrainian director and writer Alexander Petrovich Dovzhenko was born on 12 September 1894 in Sosnica into a poor farmer family. In his childhood he was lived in a small town in Ukraine, in Chernigov Governorate. About his life´s goals said "The main goal of my life is not more a movie. Sometimes I get forces. I made pitifully few movies and I have no fault losing with them the best years of his life. I am a victim of barbaric working conditions, victim of misery and bureaucratic film committee“ He used to say: "It is only human just because it has the ability to completely free and compassion, otherwise it would be something like a stone carved with the letters of the laws" .
For more information click here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A part of Dovzhenkos film Earth you can see here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Aleksandr Dovzhenko - Awards
- 1932: movie Earth was nominated to Venice Film Festival.
- 1941: he won State Prize of Soviet Union - Stalinskaya Premia
- 1949: he won State Prize of Soviet Union - Stalinskaya Premia again
- 1950: he won People's Artist of the Republic
For more information click here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

The sixth festival of mute films and modern music "Mute nights festival" was the shortest and, in a good way, marginalized in the history of this event. In the past weekend, for two days in Odessa in the open show the sign, but little-known films from countries that are not considered to be cinematic. It was part of the concept of the sixth " mute nights" as the overall theme of the show - and the fate of Decommunization propaganda art in Ukraine, due to the new law, and in the world. As demonstrated by the festival program films at one time were considered propagandistic may appear in a completely new universal artistic sense years later. The Earth from director Dovzhenko was here also.
For more information click here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Oleksandr Dovzhenko National Centre is the only state enterprise in Ukraine responsible for preservation, restoration, research and increase of the National Ukrainian Film Fund. It carries out researches in the field of cinematography, publishing specialized photo albums, booklets, books and articles on the history of cinema, as well as film magazines. One of the main aims of the Centre is to promote Ukrainian cinema. According to the Law on Cinematography, all the negative prints of Ukrainian films created on public funds (including coproduction) are to be stored at Dovzhenko Centre.
For more information click here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

On 15th April 2013, the largest Danish film festival CPH PIX and National Oleksandr Dovzhenko Centre were presented a newly restored version of Oleksandr Dovzhenko's classic Earth (1930) with live musical accompaniment by the iconic ethno-chaos band DakhaBrakha. Dovzhenko is well-known in Scandinavia, primarily as a master of composition, close-ups and landscapes; consequently he is often compared with Carl Theodor Dreyer, the cult Danish director.
For more information click here

Maria Kabatova said...

Ukrain literature has started to be more and more popular among Slovak people.
Library for the youth of the city Košice organized meeting with Ukrainian literature, through the author's meetings and workshops MAČ 2015 came to present author and co-organizer of the summer literary festival Month of Author Reading in the city of Lviv Hryhorij Semenčuk.

Maria Kabatova said...

Poet, musician and festival coordinator Grygori Semenchuk was born in 1991 in Khmelnytskyi and studied Ukrainian language and culture in Lviv. He coordinates the Lviv street magazine Prosto Neba and, together with poet and writer Yurii Izdryk, co-founded the musical project DrumTYátr. In 2009, he started working as the programme director of the largest literary festival in Ukraine, the yearly World Editors Forum in Lviv; he also periodically participates in several other events, including performances and various other festivals (LitTer, Kyjivsi lavry). He published one poetry collection – Vnutrishniy dzhykhad.

Maria Kabatova said...

. National Union of Writers of Ukraine signed an agreement on cooperation with the Society of Ukrainian Writers in Slovakia. The aim of this agreement is to become familiar with the current cultural and literary life in our countries, the structure and the work of our writers' organizations and especially with the cultural and literary life of Ukrainians in Slovakia.

Maria Kabatova said...

We can see ukraine literarure also in Slovakia.Ukrainian Literature in Slovakia promotes the most famous magazine SUSS Dukľa. Only few people know about changes in literary works from Ukraine.However this magazine wonts to inform us about it.

Maria Kabatova said...

International literary festival Month of Author Reading in Košiciah also represents Ukrainian woman literauru. His work also presented really young but already very successful author. "There were, for example, Pavlo Korobčuk, Oleksandr Klymenko, Ostap Slyvynskyj and Oleksandr Myched, all very young writers who help promote literature worldwide.

Maria Kabatova said...

Pavlo was born in 1984 in Luck, Volhynia, as a son to the poet and critic Peter Korobchuk. He studied Oriental studies. He is a poet – one that is among the generation of so-called “Two-thousanders”, authors who started writing after 2000 (collections Jakobynebe: opusy [Near-heaven: Opuses], 2005; Kajfologie, 2010; Kameňolom [Quarry], translated and published in Slovakia in 2013) – and a prose-writer (Moře pro leváka [Sea for a left-hander], 2012). He works as a journalist and plays drums in a band called Rajdo. He has been actively participating in Ukrainian slam poetry contests since 2006 and he has won them so many times that they nearly ceased to be organized in last three years. He performs at literary festivals in and outside Ukraine as well. He is known for his passion for football. He claims that “man is a god of their own life”.

Maria Kabatova said...

Oleksandr Klymenko was born in 1970 in Korostyshiv, a town in the Zhotomyr region in Ukraine. Growing up in a teacher’s family, Klymenko went on to become a writer, a literary critic and a conservatory-trained musician. In 2006, he published the Supraphon project – a part book, part LP containing short stories and novelettes; he is also known for the novel Korostyshevskiy Platonov (2010) and the collection of literary criticism and essays Vid ne-potchatku i do ne-kinca [From the Unbeginning to the Unend] (2013). Aside from writing, Klymenko has an interest in contemporary classical music – he is a member of the SAT band and performs throughout Ukraine and abroad. Through his work, the reader is presented with the illusory nature of existence, and according to critic Yevhen Baran, Klymenko “uses the compositional approach of an artistic mosaic, hoping to capture both Time and the Human in one single moment.”

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Entuziazm (Simfoniya Donbassa): The first sound film of Dziga Vertov, this is a tribute to the first Soviet 5 year plan, opening with the forcible transformation of churches to social and political clubs, filming work in the coal mines of the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine, capturing the sights and sounds of steel and locomotive works, and finishing with some scenes of harvests in the Ukraine countryside. Most of the focus is on work and the potential glories of the new Soviet citizens who promise to exceed the quotas of the five year plan. This is a marvel mostly because of Vertov's mastery of the early sound technology which required cameras that weighed over a ton. With speeches and inter-titles shifting between Ukrainian and Russian, there is no narrative, no actors, no script and only some visual references to Eisenstein's fictional works. It is easy to see why this film was more praised outside of the Soviet Union than inside and why so few of the workers filmed had any interest in watching it.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Filmography of Dziga Vertov
1919 Кинонеделя (Kino Nedelya, Cinema Week)
1919 Годовщина революции (Anniversary of the Revolution)
1922 История гражданской войны (History of the Civil War)
1924 Советские игрушки (Soviet Toys)
1924 Кино-глаз (Cinema Eye)
1925 Киноправда (Kino-Pravda)
1926 Шестая часть мира (A Sixth of the World/The Sixth Part of the World)
1928 Одиннадцатый (The Eleventh Year)
1929 Человек с киноаппаратом (Man with a Movie Camera)
1930 Энтузиазм (Симфония Донбаса) (Enthusiasm)
1934 Три песни о Ленине (Three Songs About Lenin)
1937 Памяти Серго Орджоникидзе (In Memory of Sergo Ordzhonikidze)
1937 Колыбельная (Lullaby)
1938 Три героини (Three Heroines)
1942 Казахстан — фронту! (Kazakhstan for the Front!)
1944 В горах Ала-Тау (In the Mountains of Ala-Tau)
1954 Новости дня (News of the Day)

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Dziga Vertov was born as Denis Abramovich (later changed to Arkadievich) Kaufman in a Jewish book-dealer’s family. As a child, he studied piano and violin, and at ten began to write poetry. Then, in 1916 Vertov enrolled in Petrograd Psychoneurological Institute. For his studies of human perception, he recorded and edited natural sounds in his ‘Laboratory of Hearing,’ trying to create new forms of sound effects by means of the rhythmic grouping of phonetic units. At this time the Futurists and Formalists were also very influential in Russia and beyond. Kaufman invented the nom de guerre ‘Dziga Vertov’ (roughly, ‘the humming top’). In 1918 Mikhail Koltstov, who headed the Moscow Film Committee’s newsreel section, hired Vertov as his assistant. Among Vertov’s colleagues was Lev Kuleshov, who was conducting his now legendary experiments in montage, as well as Edouard Tissé, Eisenstein’s future cameraman.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

So much of what Dziga Vertov thought and wrote about cinema was written at the time of the greatest propagandist uproar in the twentieth century—the birth of the Modern Soviet State. Yet so much, in hindsight, sounds more like a classic realist position than that of the formalist experiments Vertov claimed for his group, Kino-Pravda and its doctrine of Kino Eye—the term he invented to cover both the ideology of his short lived group and the filmmakers in it. For a little more than ten years he was, along with Sergei Eisenstein, the leading theoretician of the new art of cinema itself and by the end of that ten years his career and his outpouring of cinema ideas were effectively over.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Vertov’s concept of a self-reflective cinema, of the viewer identifying himself with the filmmaking process, would really only reappear at the end of the 1950s in the work of filmmakers like Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, or in America, Stan Brakhage.When sound came, Vertov moved briefly ahead of Eisenstein and most of the other silent cinema masters. He was prepared for the sound revolution because of his early experiments with noise recording, and in A Sixth of the World he had even experimented a la John Cage with rhythmic substitutes for the human voice. By alternating the phrases with images, Vertov achieved the illusion of off-screen narration. His first real sound picture, Enthusiasm, Donbass Symphony (1931), was an instant success abroad.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Clip from Vertov´s Enthusiasm(Donbass Symphony)

Veronika Chlapíková said...

"I would never have believed it possible to assemble mechanical noises to create such beauty. One of the most superb symphonies I have known. Dziga Vertov is a musician"
Charlie Chaplin

Maria Kabatova said...

Ostap Slyvynsky was born in 1978 in Lviv and studied Bulgarian language and literature at Lviv University; today, he works here at the Department of Polish Language and Literature. He is a poet, translator and literary scientist, best known for his poetry collections (Zhertvoprynoshennya velykoyi ryby [The Sacrifice of the Big Fish], published in 1998; Myach u pitmi [A Ball in the Dark]; Adam, published in 2012) and his translations of Georgi Gospodinov (from Bulgarian), Olga Tokarczuk and Andrzej Stasiuk (from Polish), and Uladzimir Arlou (from Belarus). He organizes literary festivals and works as one of the coordinators of the literary section of Lviv’s yearly World Editors Forum. Slyvynsky also sits on the editorial board of the trilingual (Polish-German-Ukrainian) literary review Radar, and his most recent project explores the synthesis of poetry with visual art.

Maria Kabatova said...

Oleksandr Mykhed was born in Kiev in 1988 and after finishing his university studies, became a research fellow at the Taras Sevchenko Institute of Literature of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. A culturologist and literary theorist, Mykhed is also the curator of several art projects, notably the Amnezia open multimedia platform and the literary section of Gogolfest, an annual art and film festival in Kiev. His short story collection Pontyizm, written in 2011–2012, presents 25 stories that explore various cultural codes; in one of them, Mykhed imagines a war between Ukraine and Russia that – in the world of omnipresent media and social networks – becomes a worldwide reality show. He claims that “these thoughts of war were born from a vision of a global apocalypse, which – on the eve of 2012 – kept forcing itself onto one’s mind”.

Maria Kabatova said...

Into the slovak literature have started pervaded language components from Ukraine. In our literatur ethere are named ukraizmy. However, sometimes we do not know region of origin because this words came to our country through russian or they are undertaken from other languages. For example it could bet he word haidamak – word comes from Turkey

Maria Kabatova said...

Slovak writers sometimes use also some dialects of particular country or region. Slovaks who live near to the Ukraine also use their dialect. Their vocabulary consist of words which have Slavonic and Old Russian origin. For example : among these people there is the tendency to decline the words in connection to gender : sluhovi/sluhom although, the standard language in Ukraine use sluzi / sluhoju.

Maria Kabatova said...

Ukrainian Literature has a thousand years of history. The beginnings belong to the period of Kievan Rus. However, even prehistoric times (in ІХ. Centuries) ancestors of Ukrainians had developed an oral creativity. An important monument of those times is the chronicle "The reputation of the past years", which is not only a source of historical events, but is also a reader of epic songs, legends and tales epoch of Kievan Rus. The poetic masterpiece of the ancient literature is the "Word of Igor's Regiment".

Maria Kabatova said...

The highlight of the old Ukrainian literature of the Baroque period - is the creation of poet and philosopher Hryhoriy Skovoroda (1722-1794). "Ukrainian Socrates' roamed the Ukraine and the countries of Central Europe to get to know people. By continuously for the philosopher Hryhoriy Skovoroda seems to be the problem of happiness, which it holds through the revelation of the divine nature of man, finding the talent that has been inserted into it the man.

Maria Kabatova said...

Poema which was written by Ivan Kotlyarevsky in 17th century "Enejida" meant the emergence of the latest literary Ukrainian language and the beginning of modern Ukrainian literature. This work contains pearls of Ukrainian humor, shows the colorful folk way of life. Moreover, in these time, Kvitka-Osnovjanenko broke the tradition of the use of the Ukrainian language only in comic genres.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Abram Room (1894–1976) was born in Vilnius and studied medicine in Petrograd and Saratov, while also becoming active in amateur theater. In 1923 he moved to Moscow and shifted his activity from theater to filmmaking. In his early films he charted an individual course between the avant-garde and conventional narrative cinema. His best work is characterized by psychological complexity and profound insight into the problems of social change. His later films were more wide-ranging in theme and more conventional in form. Room was a prolific filmmaker with some twenty-five feature films to his credit.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A Severe Young Man 1934 ‘Strogiy yunosha’ directed by Abram Room
The film’s content makes no concessions to the usual expectations of Soviet audiences of the 1930s. The cast of characters is extremely unlikely in almost every conventional respect. The action involves the household of the prominent Dr. Stepanov and his young wife, Masha, who share their large and richly adorned mansion with the parasitical Fedor Tsitronov, whose presence in the household is given only the most implausible of explanations. Equally implausible is the acquaintance of the family with the young and proud Grisha Fokin, whose leadership role in the Young Communist League is never clearly defined and who is never seen engaged in any work or professional activity.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Precious few had seen the film A Severe Young Man when the administration of the Ukrainfil'm studio announced, in the summer of 1936, that the film had been banned for release and distribution. The ban ought not to have come as a surprise to anyone. The official explanations for the decision to shelve the film were vague in their details, but clear and utterly predictable in regards to their fundamental accusation: the film was a self-indulgent exercise in formalist experimentation that utterly failed to adhere to the aesthetic requirements of Socialist Realism. The strict and uncompromising verdict of the authorities provided yet more unnecessary proof that the guardians of Soviet orthodoxy had absolutely no understanding or appreciation of irony. A more accurate translation of the Russian title would be "strict" or "uncompromising," adjectives that can be applied to almost no element of this film save for its protagonist, whose uncompromising character is portrayed with what can only be regarded (at least today) a healthy dose of irony.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A Severe Young Man
The film was a true collaboration between the scriptwriter, Iurii Olesha, and the director Abram Room for whom the script was specifically written. Both men were extremely talented creative individuals who despite their seemingly earnest attempts could never quite find a comfortable fit between their works and the ideological demands of the times. Indeed, Room made A Severe Young Man in Ukraine not by choice, but because he was working in professional exile from Moscow as punishment for various "mistakes" made in his previous films. Room’s best work was often daringly provocative, and even those of his films that received wide distribution were often vilified by the critics. Olesha, for his part, was a successful playwright and prose writer throughout the 1920s, but his best works, while on the surface ideologically correct, contained in their deeper texture disturbingly discordant notes. His literary output decreased after 1928 and, as a writer, he fell largely silent after 1934. The two men shared a common vision for A Severe Young Man and the resulting film contributed to the shame of both in equal measure in 1936

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A Severe Young Man was selected in the following festivals :
- International Festival of Contemporary Cinema «Zavtra / 2morrow», Moscow (Russia), 2012
- Russian film symposium. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (USA), 2012
- Festival "Polka. liberated cinema", Moscow (Russia), 2011
- Moscow International Film Festival (MIFF), Moscow (Russia), 2011
- International Film Festival : Pacific Meridians, Vladivostok (Russia), 2009
- Moscow International Film Festival (MIFF), Moscow (Russia), 2008
- Open Russian Film Festival Kinotavr, Sochi (Russia), 2007
- Gels et dégels, une autre histoire du cinéma soviétique (1926-1968), Paris (France), 2002
- Film Festival Locarno, Locarno (Switzerland), 2000
- La Rochelle International Film Festival, La Rochelle (France), 1994
- Berlin International Film Festival : Berlinale, Berlin (Germany), 1990

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Click to see part of film A severe young man

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Awards of Abram Room
1965 - Won People's Artist of the Republic (Russia)
1949 - Won Stalinskaya Premia- State Prize of Soviet Union
1946 - Won Stalinskaya Premia- State Prize of Soviet Union

Maria Kabatova said...

In 19th century Poetic collection "Kobzar" greatest Ukrainian poet Taras Shevchenko, who was born in 1840, has become a de facto declaration of the literary and intellectual independence of the Ukrainians. Creation of Taras Shevchenko defined on the decades ahead following the development of Ukrainian literature.

Maria Kabatova said...

Literary process of the second half 19th century was formed under the influence of the formation of talented writers - Ivan Něčuja, Mark Vovčka, Panas Myrného, Mykhailo Kocjubynského, Ivan Franko, Olha Kobyljanské, Borys Hrinčenka and others. For the literature of this period is characterized by the diversity of artistic trends and individual styles of writing, using different genres

Maria Kabatova said...

An example of significant figures in the history of not only Ukrainian, but also in world culture is the figure of Ivan Franko - poet, writer, dramaturge, journalist, literary critic, theorist and translator .. Creative stock of I. Franko surprised his nedozírností (more than 50 parts). Writer as one of the first began translating the creation of world literature in the Ukrainian language (J. Goethe, H. Heine, G. Byron).

Maria Kabatova said...

at the turn of the century Ukrainian literature is influence by European modernism. We can see it in the creation of two leading figures of this period - poetess Lesya Ukrainka and prose writer Mykhailo Kocjubynského. Lesya Ukrainka enriched Ukrainian literature images of world literature, subjects from history, mythology different eras and different nations of the world

Maria Kabatova said...

After the revolution the literary process is characterized by a particular dramatism and complexity. But Ukrainian literature at that time was experiencing prosperity. On the rich literature palette, there were various artistic schools, styles and directions - from radical Proletkult to Futurism and even neoclassicism, whose leaders have focused on creating a highly harmonious art

Maria Kabatova said...

during the civil war in the years 1932-1933 and the Bolshevik repression in the 30s there were many writers killed and imprisoned. In the years 1938-1954 have been affected by repression around 240 Ukrainian writers, even though many of them were adherents of the Soviet power, fought for it and became writers already after the revolution. Some of them were shot dead, some died in prison, some of them remained unaccounted for after imprisonment

Maria Kabatova said...

despite strict socialist realism, the Ukrainian writers managed to make literature that has not lost its urgency today. They are mainly works of P. Tyčyny, M. Rylského, V. Sosjury, O. Dovzhenko, O. Hončar and others.
In the 60s, thanks to the liberalization of social and political life in Ukraine recommitting powerful art movement, whose leaders were later called the "sixties".

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Mark Donskoy, in full Mark Semyonovich Donskoy (born March 6 [February 21, Old Style], 1901, Odessa, Ukraine, Russia—died March 24, 1981, Moscow), motion-picture writer and director best known for a trilogy based on the autobiography of the Russian proletarian novelist Maksim Gorky.

In 1926 Donskoy began his cinema career as a scriptwriter and assistant director. He soon became a director of lyrical and personal films that differed markedly from the grand-scale Russian melodramas of the 1930s. The three films based on the life of Donskoy’s friend Gorky, Detstvo Gorkogo (1938; Childhood of Maksim Gorky), V lyudyakh (1939; On His Own), and Moi universitety (1940; University of Life), sensitively interpolate scenes from Gorky’s short stories into the factual narrative to compose one of the finest of all film biographies.

Other major films are Raduga (1944; “The Rainbow”) and Nepokoryonnye (1945; “Unconquered”), which show Donskoy’s skill with child actors; two more films adapted from the writings of Gorky, Mat (1956; Mother) and Foma Gordeyev (1956; The Gordeyev Family); and his diptych, Serdtsye matery/Vernost matery (1966–67; Heart of a Mother/A Mother’s Devotion). Donskoy was twice given the Order of Lenin, the U.S.S.R.’s highest civilian award.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Plot of The Rainbow
The German conquerors are above nothing, not even the slaughter of small children, to break the spirit of their Soviet captives. Suffering more than most is Olga (Nataliya Uzhviy), a Soviet partisan who returns to the village to bear her child, only to endure the cruelest of arbitrary tortures at the hands of the Nazis. Eventually, the villagers rise up against their oppressors-but unexpectedly do not wipe them out, electing instead to force the surviving Nazis to stand trial for their atrocities in a postwar "people's court." (It is also implied that those who collaborated with the Germans will be dealt with in the same evenhanded fashion)

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Mark Donskoj and his movie The Rainbow was selected in following festivals and get awards like:

- 1946 Stalin Prize
- 1944 American Association of Film Critics Extra prize (Mark Donskoy)
- 1944 Award of the newspaper "Daily News" for the best foreign film, demontrirovavshiysya in the United States in 1944 (Mark Donskoy)
- 1944 Stalin Prize
- 1970 International Film Festival in Karlovy Vary

Veronika Chlapíková said...

"Mark Donskoy (1901–1981) was “the king” because he won several Stalin Prizes, the highest Soviet mark of achievement. But he was also “the Jester” because, at the time, playing a village idiot was a survival strategy. As the documentary points out, however, the mask grew into his face. He was a prankster and a master of the practical joke (from the first row in the Moscow film theater, he used to stick out his foot to trip those who came in late). It is with mixed feelings that he is recalled by his former crew and cast members.
The great director had an unpredictable temper and could explode on set. But for the regime, his reputation as an “emotional” artist served as an excuse: “The Jester” was allowed a greater freedom. Indeed, it is amazing to see how often Donskoy’s films, even the most serious ones, rely on the trope of the carnival. Nearly each one of them features playful scenes taking place at the fairs and folk festivals, with musicians, clowns, bells and bears. A generous montage of those included in the documentary gives an insight into the filmmaker’s own burlesque character." said Olga Gershenson

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Click to see part of Mark Donskoy movie The rainbow

Veronika Chlapíková said...

The USSR State Prize (Russian: Госуда́рственная пре́мия СССР) was the Soviet Union's state honor. It was established on September 9, 1966. After the breakup of the Soviet Union, the prize was followed up by the State Prize of the Russian Federation.
The State Stalin Prize (Государственная Сталинская премия), usually called the Stalin Prize, existed from 1941 to 1954 - some sources give an incorrect termination date of 1952. It essentially played the same role; therefore upon the establishment of the USSR State Prize, the diplomas and badges of the recipients of Stalin Prize were changed to that of USSR State Prize.

In 1944 and 1945, the last two years of the Second World War the award ceremonies for the Stalin Prize were not held. Instead, in 1946 the ceremony was held twice: in January for the works created in 1943-1944 and in June for the works of 1945.

USSR State Prize of 1st, 2nd and 3rd degrees was awarded annually to individuals in the fields of science, mathematics, literature, arts, and architecture to honor the most prominent achievements which either advanced the Soviet Union or the cause of socialism. Often the prize was awarded to specific works rather than to individuals.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

People's Artist of Russia (Народный артист России Narodny artist Rossii), also sometimes translated as National Artist of Russia, is an honorary and the highest title awarding to outstanding performing artists whose merits are exceptional in the sphere of the development of the performing arts (theatre, music, dance, circus, cinema, etc.). granted to citizens of Russia.

Jakub Bartok said...
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Jakub Bartok said...
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Maria Kabatova said...

This tribe belonged V. Stus, L. Kostenko, V. Simonenko, G. Ťuťunnyk, D. Pavlyčko, I. Drach and others. Sixties "looking for new forms of creativity, a new concept of national experience within a totalitarian system

Maria Kabatova said...

Contemporary Ukrainian literature consists of a new generation of writers Yuri Andrukhovych, Oleksandr Orvanec, Yuri Izdryk, Oksana Zabuzhko, Mykola Rjabčuk, Pokalčuk Yuri, Yuri Vynnyčuk, Kostantyn Moskalec, Natalka Bilocerkivec, Vasyl Škljar, Jevhenija Kononenko

Maria Kabatova said...

Shevchenko National Prize (Ukrainian: Націона́льна пре́мія Украї́ни і́мені Тараса́ Шевче́нка; also Shevchenko Award) is the highest state prize of Ukraine for works of culture and arts awarded since 1961. It is named after the inspirator of Ukrainian national revival Taras Shevchenko.It is one of the five state prizes of Ukraine that are awarded for achievements in various fields. The National Prize is awarded annually by the order of the President of Ukraine. There are up to five prizes in the following nominations:
• Literature (fiction or artistic literature)
• Literature (non-fiction or documentary and scientifically critical literature)
• Journalism and opinion journalism
• Performing Arts (theatrical, musical, others)
• Other Arts (folk and visual)

Maria Kabatova said...

Kobzar Literary Award

Presented every two years, the $25,000 prize recognizes a Canadian writer who most effectively presents a Ukrainian Canadian theme through poetry, drama, fiction, non-fiction or young people’s literature. The Kobzar Literary Award challenges Canadian writers to explore a Ukrainian Canadian theme.

Maria Kabatova said...

Best-selling books in the Ukraine in 2002:
1st Valery Shevchuk - Silver milk, Lviv, exp. Kalvarija
2. Yuri Vynnyčuk - Place the Dragon, Lviv, exp. Piramida
3rd Jevhenija Kononenko - Betrayal, Lviv, exp. Kalvarija

Maria Kabatova said...

Ivan Yakovych Franko was a Ukrainian poet, writer, social and literary critic, journalist, interpreter, economist, political activist, doctor of philosophy, ethnographer, the author of the first detective novels and modern poetry in the Ukrainian language.He was a political radical, and a founder of the socialist and nationalist movement in western Ukraine.

Maria Kabatova said...

In addition to literary work of I.Y. Franko , he also translated the works of such renowned figures as William Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Dante Alighieri, Victor Hugo, Friedrich Schiller …into the Ukrainian language. Along with Taras Shevchenko, he has had a tremendous impact on modern literary and political thought in Ukraine.

Maria Kabatova said...

Eliáš Galajda is Ukrainian writer with Slovak citizenship. In 1958 he started to work as an editor in editorial office of "Dukľa" a "Družno vpered" in Prešov, Slovakia. After his career as lecturer and tutor he has retired and currently lives in Prešov. Eliáš became a member of the Association of Slovak writers in 1982. He is also a member of the Association of Ukrainian writers in Slovakia a member of Association of Slovak writers organisations[2] and The National Writer's Union of Ukraine.

Maria Kabatova said...

Hryhorij Skovoroda is a major figure in the history of Ukrainian and Russian literature and philosophy. He is not only a famou writer, moreover, he has become popular for his Quotes
"Water cannot exist without fish, just as air without birds, just as time without people."
"Your feet can't help but lose their way, when your heart has lost it."
"Can a person, who is blind at home, see clearly at the marketplace?"
"Wisdom was not created from books, but books were created from wisdom

Maria Kabatova said...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pas5upWWLlI

If you want you can click here and listen to the ukraainian anthem which was written by Schevchenko.

Maria Kabatova said...

Large colorful albums with beautiful illustrations look good in a home library and office’s waiting room. Ukrainian publishers have plenty to offer in that area, including books of Ukrainian art, photography and city views. Here are the Kyiv Post’s choices for five best coffee table books:
http://www.kyivpost.com/guide/books/five-cool-ukrainian-coffee-table-books-331573.html

Maria Kabatova said...

PETRO MIĎANKA (1959) is one of the most distinctive and the most respected author of Ukrainian literature. He is known as the 'new wave'. And the specificity of the indigenous language of his poetry, thematically tied to the genius loci Zakarpatia. He is a teacher of the Ukrainian language, he has published seven collections of poems – for example The smell of bitter.

Maria Kabatova said...

Here are written statement which were said by Petro Miďanka about ukrainian literature:
Ukrainian poetry is in the world little known. If you heard something abut it , it's thanks to our artists - emigrants. Most of Ukrainian poets cooperate with the Poland. The most important role in literary coolaboration plays the city of Lviv because it is a strong cultural centre of the western region.

Maria Kabatova said...

Many of our writers need special place for writing a new book. We need solitude, however it is impossible to write evary day. For example, I need to talk with my friends as well as with my enemies. Moreover, I find inspiration in Šyrokyj Luh. If authors want to write grat book, thay have to write on place, where thay fell comfortable or on place, where they have unforgettable experiences

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A Spring for the Thirsty, Jurij Iljenko
This film is now considered an important part of the Ukrainian film heritage. It was made in 1965 but was not released until 1987. Director Yuri Ilyenko, who served as a cinematographer on Sergei Paradjanov's acclaimed Shadows of our Forgotten Ancestors is widely regarded as a living treasure of Ukrainian cinema. In this impressionistic and spare black-and-white film, evocative imagery dominates the story and there is very little dialogue. The life of a man who lives in a desert oasis is unveiled. He is an old man, and except for the occasional visits of strangers seeking to slake their thirst at the village well, nothing very much happens where he lives. In one scene, the old man himself is seen as imprisoned within the well. In another, a jet flies overhead and a car approaches carrying family members who have brought the old man a tape recorder as a present.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A spring for the thirsty was selected in the following festivals :
- Moscow International Film Festival (MIFF), Moscow (Russia), 2011
- Festival Russian kino 'Moscow Premier Screenings', Moscow (Russia), 2010
- Kyiv International Film Festival 'Molodist', Kiev (Ukraine), 2007

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Yuri Ilyenko was born in Cherkasy in 1936 but during World War II he and his family where evacuated to Siberia while his father was in the Red Army. He graduated high school in Moscow and in 1960 Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography in 1960. From 1960 till 1963 he worked as the director of photography at the Yalta Film Studio. In 1963 Ilyenko became operator and then director at Dovzhenko Film Studios.His 1965 film "Spring for the thirsty" (scenario by Ivan Drach) and 1968 film "Vechir Na Hutori Ivan Kupala" where both banned by the Soviet authorities till 1988.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Part of the movie Spring for the thirsty you can see here

Veronika Chlapíková said...

A Spring for the thirsty is an abstract visual work and not for the casual moviegoer, but its rewards are great for those who appreciate the sublime power of simplicity. It is a simple parable about the absoluteness of human thirst. Ilyenko's images are also simple, and their power may be lost on contemporary audiences used to high-tech special effects. The purity in his close-ups of the old man, the dying soldier, the thirsty young brides, and the village children are what make A spring for the thirsty a masterful work.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Filmography of Yuri Ilyenko (1936–2010)
2002 Molitva za getmana Mazepu
1990 Lebedyne ozero. Zona
1987 Solomennye kolokola
1983 Legenda o knyagine Olge
1981 Lesnaya pesnya. Mavka
1979 Poloska neskoshennych dikikh tsvetov
1979 Prazdnik pechyonoy kartoshki
1974 Mechtat i zhit
1974 Naperekor vsemu
1971 Bilyy ptakh z chornoyu vidznakoyu
1968 Vecher nakanune Ivana Kupala
1965 Rodnik dlya zhazhdushchikh

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Kira Muratova has never been given her due in the Soviet and post-Soviet Russia.In the "Long Good Bye" she depicts a seemingly banal story of a jealous and possessive mother (brilliantly acted by Zinaida Sharko) and her poor aloof and lonely son (the only cinematic role by the talented O. Vladimirsky). The story grows into the wonderful and frightening analysis of alienation between genders and generations on the background of the even more frighteningly bleak and dehumanized Soviet reality.Kira Muratova shows the tiny details of everyday Soviet life,and, again , banal as they are ,they are a hair-raising horror.The dialogue is deliberately laconic and void of any sense, showing the ever-growing people's inability to communicate and understand each other.The sound track ( by another under-estimated talent, Oleg Karavaichuk)adds to the atmosphere of hopeless and meaningless existence.Of course,Sasha (the name of the protagonist),will leave his despotic mother sooner or later, but where for?

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Flights in Dreams and in Reality, Roman Balayan

On the eve of his 40th birthday, Sergei Makarov (Oleg Yankovsky), looks back at his life and suddenly realizes that he has achieved nothing. He was not able make himself or the closest people in his life happy; his long-suffering wife, his young mistress, friends and work bring him no sense of joy...
This is a story about men who never grow up and find themselves in a time of stagnation: gifted, charming, but infantile and lost, they are never able to realize their full potential...
This film became a megahit in the Soviet Union in the '80's.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Flights in Dreams and in Reality, Roman Balayan
This film became a super-hit in the Soviet Union of the eightieth. The audiences were divided into two camps. Some saw it as a personal insult, others - as a personal victory, as truth about their time and about themselves. Some of the best Russian actors gave very good performances (Oleg Yankovsky, Oleg Tabakov, Lyudmila Gurchenko and Nikita Mikhalkov in a short but memorable cameo) but the movie belongs to its era and it did not age well..

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Director Roman Balayan asked his friend, director and actor Nikita Mikhalkov, to find a writer for this film. Mikhalkov advised Viktor Merezhko and Balayan said later on that the film wouldn't have been made without Merezhko's help. Balayan wanted Mikhalkov to play Sergey Makarov, the protagonist, as well and Merezhko wrote the role for Mikhalkov, but Balayan changed his mind shortly before filming, after accidentally seeing Oleg Yankovskiy in My, nizhepodpisavshiyesya (1981) on TV. Mikhalkov ended up playing a small role of a movie director in the film and Sergey Makarov's wife was played by Lyudmila Zorina, Yankovskiy's wife in real life.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Roman Balayan Awards
Berlin International Film Festival: 1978- Nominated -Golden Berlin Bear
Istanbul International Film Festival: 1987- Won- Golden Tulip
Karlovy Vary International Film Festival: 1998- Nominated - Crystal Globe
Molodist International Film Festival: 2003- Won- Special Award for the development of the National Cinematograph
Moscow International Film Festival: 2008- Nominated- Golden St. George
Nika Awards: 2009 - Won- Nika
Venice Film Festival: 1986- Nominated- Golden Lion
Yerevan International Film Festival: 2011- Won - Lifetime Achievement Award

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Flights in Dreams and in Reality trailer

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Moscow International Film Festival (Russian: Моско́вский междунаро́дный кинофестива́ль), is the film festival first held in Moscow in 1935 and became regular since 1959. From its inception to 1995 it was held every second year in July, alternating with the Karlovy Vary festival. The festival has been held annually since 1995. The festival's top prize is the statue of Saint George slaying the dragon, as represented on the Coat of Arms of Moscow. Nikita Mikhalkov has been the festival's president since 2000.

Veronika Chlapíková said...

Molodist International Film Festival is the major regular cinema event in Ukraine and Eastern Europe as considered by FIAPF. Every year the festival presents more than 250 films from all over the world. Competition program consists of sections of student films, first short films and first full-feature films. We give a dynamic of development of the most important trends of a young cinema from all over the world.